Fully Booked

We're all mad here (News and [re]views)

I found empirical support for the idea that the Harry Potter series influenced the political values and perspectives of the generation that came of age with these books. Reading the books correlated with greater levels of acceptance for out-groups, higher political tolerance, less predisposition to authoritarianism, greater support for equality, and greater opposition to the use of violence and torture. As Harry Potter fans will have noted, these are major themes repeated throughout the series. These correlations remained significant even when applying more sophisticated statistical analyses – when controlling for, among other things, parental influence.

"Harry Potter did help shape the political culture of a generation" by Anthony Gierzynski (The Conversation)

Totally fascinating research into how reading shapes political beliefs.

(via malindalo)

I’m just so impressed with the way Ms. Marchetta takes the concept of current sociopolitical realities and infuses them into her literature. This is something that drives me crazy about other fantasies–I know it’s fun to find out who will take the throne and everything, but what about the PEOPLE? Finnikin of the Rock is high fantasy with empathy. It’s high fantasy that mourns, rather than relishes mass slaughter. Where the realities of war are suffered and confronted, not glorified. It’s a little painful, but so beautiful. The experience of the people of Lumatere has nothing to do with magic, even if the story is propelled by the fantastical world. They are refugees, victims of sexual violence, orphans. Their experience is something that people around the world are experiencing today. And it’s a truly impressive fantasy novel that makes the reader feel not only for the characters, but for real, living people, in our world.

—Rachel of Giant Squid Books reviews Finnikin of the Rock by Melina Marchetta [x] (via leaningonthesideofwonder)

…and you drink a little too much and try a little too hard. And you go home to a cold bed and think, That was fine. And your life is a long line of fine.

—Flynn, Gillian. Gone Girl.  (via wordsnquotes)

(Source: wordsnquotes, via wordsnquotes)

Currently Reading

The Museum of Extraordinary Things - Alice Hoffman [Loving it so far. Very Night Circus-ish]

The Portrait of Dorian Gray - Oscar Wilde [My classic for august]

Bronze Gods - A.A. Aguirre [Ann Aguirre’s writing is so vivid. Love her.]

I’m not sure Barbara Kingsolver will ever be able to outdo The Poisonwood Bible. However, Flight Behaviour was a well written novel that dealt with serious issues, this time, climate change. Indeed, I saw a previous reviewer refer to the book as ‘redneck environmentalism’, which is such a perfect description.Although Kingsolver is a talented writer, it was a slow read for me, hence the 3 star, not 4 star rating. She makes some very important points in the novel - the way green living is really a luxury afforded to the wealthy, the singularity of religious or community beliefs that lead to the absolute dismissal of the realm of science, the hardships of poverty or rural life where daily concerns are no bigger than putting food on the table and finding someone to look after the kids, the struggle between money and environmentalism. I am deeply interested in sustainability and climate change, and this book provided me with a whole new perspective on the approach to people and climate change.There are always more questions. Science as a process is never complete. It is not a foot race, with a finish line…. People will always be waiting at a particular finish line: journalists with their cameras, impatient crowds eager to call the race, astounded to see the scientists approach, pass the mark, and keep running. It’s a common misunderstanding, he said. They conclude there was no race. As long as we won’t commit to knowing everything, the presumption is we know nothing.” Amidst the seriousness of the issues at hand, Kingsolver also has a sly, deadpan sense of humour that is incorporated into the prose, which I absolutely love. Now, see, that’s why you want Internet friends. You can find people just exactly like you. Screw your neighbors and your family, too messy…the trouble is, once you filter out everybody that doesn’t agree with you, all that’s left is maybe this one retired surfer guy living in Idaho.” 

I’m not sure Barbara Kingsolver will ever be able to outdo The Poisonwood Bible. However, Flight Behaviour was a well written novel that dealt with serious issues, this time, climate change. Indeed, I saw a previous reviewer refer to the book as ‘redneck environmentalism’, which is such a perfect description.

Although Kingsolver is a talented writer, it was a slow read for me, hence the 3 star, not 4 star rating. She makes some very important points in the novel - the way green living is really a luxury afforded to the wealthy, the singularity of religious or community beliefs that lead to the absolute dismissal of the realm of science, the hardships of poverty or rural life where daily concerns are no bigger than putting food on the table and finding someone to look after the kids, the struggle between money and environmentalism. I am deeply interested in sustainability and climate change, and this book provided me with a whole new perspective on the approach to people and climate change.

There are always more questions. Science as a process is never complete. It is not a foot race, with a finish line…. People will always be waiting at a particular finish line: journalists with their cameras, impatient crowds eager to call the race, astounded to see the scientists approach, pass the mark, and keep running. It’s a common misunderstanding, he said. They conclude there was no race. As long as we won’t commit to knowing everything, the presumption is we know nothing.” 

Amidst the seriousness of the issues at hand, Kingsolver also has a sly, deadpan sense of humour that is incorporated into the prose, which I absolutely love. 

Now, see, that’s why you want Internet friends. You can find people just exactly like you. Screw your neighbors and your family, too messy…the trouble is, once you filter out everybody that doesn’t agree with you, all that’s left is maybe this one retired surfer guy living in Idaho.” 

Bought goodies from The Book Depository!

Isla and the Happily Ever After, The Dream Thieves, Graffiti Moon, The Wizard’s Promise…and preordered Heir of Fire, The Winter Long and Blue Lily, Lily Blue!

And then I raided a second hand bookstore this weekend. *shifty eyes*

Some Oscar Wilde, Trudi Caravan, Laini Taylor, David Sedaris, Haruki Murakami…as well as The Miniaturists, which has some awesome reviews. 

LET THE READING COMMENCE!

Sweet, fun, feel-good read. Includes one of my favourite tropes - hate turning to love…da na na na naaaaaa.I will admit, the continuous use of “Mama” and “daddy” got on my nerves, but it is a southern novel, so it’s more of a personal annoyance. Also, the way our MC would flounce off angrily after every confrontation was also a tad irritating. However, these are small niggles - if you’re looking for a contemporary novel that will leave you with a squishy aww feeling, then look no further.

Sweet, fun, feel-good read. Includes one of my favourite tropes - hate turning to love…da na na na naaaaaa.

I will admit, the continuous use of “Mama” and “daddy” got on my nerves, but it is a southern novel, so it’s more of a personal annoyance. Also, the way our MC would flounce off angrily after every confrontation was also a tad irritating. 

However, these are small niggles - if you’re looking for a contemporary novel that will leave you with a squishy aww feeling, then look no further.