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Creepy, twisted, compelling. Abigail Haas, as I mentioned while I was reading, is the QUEEN of psychological thriller-type YA novels. Seriously. She has a gift for creating utterly relatable murderous characters, which is a tad disturbing in and of itself. In Dangerous Boys, we have a story of 2 brothers and our MC, Chloe. I don’t feel that it’s spoilery to say that there are love triangle elements (I use the term *love* very loosely here), since you can figure it out from page 1.What follows is an exploration of Chloe’s frustrations at being trapped in a small town with seemingly no way out, her relationship with her boyfriend, and what appears to be a very twisted game of chicken with Oliver, a character who I utterly loathe.And that, ladies and gentlemen, is where I end this review, because saying anything else will spoil what is a carefully constructed plot and series of reveals.Three teens venture into the abandoned Monroe estate one night; hours later, only two emerge from the burning wreckage. Chloe drags one Reznick brother to safety, unconscious and bleeding; the other is left to burn, dead in the fire. But which brother survives? And is his death a tragic accident? Desperate self-defense? Or murder?

Creepy, twisted, compelling. Abigail Haas, as I mentioned while I was reading, is the QUEEN of psychological thriller-type YA novels. Seriously. She has a gift for creating utterly relatable murderous characters, which is a tad disturbing in and of itself. 

In Dangerous Boys, we have a story of 2 brothers and our MC, Chloe. I don’t feel that it’s spoilery to say that there are love triangle elements (I use the term *love* very loosely here), since you can figure it out from page 1.

What follows is an exploration of Chloe’s frustrations at being trapped in a small town with seemingly no way out, her relationship with her boyfriend, and what appears to be a very twisted game of chicken with Oliver, a character who I utterly loathe.

And that, ladies and gentlemen, is where I end this review, because saying anything else will spoil what is a carefully constructed plot and series of reveals.

Three teens venture into the abandoned Monroe estate one night; hours later, only two emerge from the burning wreckage. Chloe drags one Reznick brother to safety, unconscious and bleeding; the other is left to burn, dead in the fire. But which brother survives? And is his death a tragic accident? Desperate self-defense? Or murder?

fishingboatproceeds:

aliewa:

grouchythefish:

ladyofpurple:

I like how the original title for The Fault in Our Stars is all poetic and then the Norwegians just translated it to “fuck destiny” and I think that’s beautiful

Aw man, I thought for sure this had to be bullshit but nope


Why is it always Norway

Norway, a nation where you can put the word “fuck” on the cover of a young adult novel.

fishingboatproceeds:

aliewa:

grouchythefish:

ladyofpurple:

I like how the original title for The Fault in Our Stars is all poetic and then the Norwegians just translated it to “fuck destiny” and I think that’s beautiful

Aw man, I thought for sure this had to be bullshit but nope

image

Why is it always Norway

Norway, a nation where you can put the word “fuck” on the cover of a young adult novel.

Shakespeare’s take on modern pop songs. 
(source: Slate)

Shakespeare’s take on modern pop songs. 

(source: Slate)

Brenna Yovanoff is incredibly talented at creating deliciously creepy novels that examine the best and worst of human nature, while not getting too dark or horrifying. [Horror is not my thing.]In Fiendish, we have our MC, Clementine DeVore, who’s been locked in a cellar for ten years, and one day gets rescued by Fisher, resident bad boy. *eyeroll* Apart from the slightly stereotypical romance, I adored the novel, and it reminded me a little of The Crucible, with the whole town ready to grasp their pitchforks and annihilate anything that doesn’t fit into their narrative of what’s right and normal.The supporting characters were wonderfully drawn - angry, hurt, shit-kicking cousin Shiny; clever, realistic Rae; and Fisher, constantly concerned with his own self-preservation. We experience Clementine’s sudden adjustment to a world that’s seemingly recovered from the events of ten years prior, her exploration of the dark underbelly of the town, and her need to try save everything in her path. However, with powers running amok in an uneasy community, things soon come to a head for our magically-inclined protagonists

Brenna Yovanoff is incredibly talented at creating deliciously creepy novels that examine the best and worst of human nature, while not getting too dark or horrifying. [Horror is not my thing.]

In Fiendish, we have our MC, Clementine DeVore, who’s been locked in a cellar for ten years, and one day gets rescued by Fisher, resident bad boy. *eyeroll* 

Apart from the slightly stereotypical romance, I adored the novel, and it reminded me a little of The Crucible, with the whole town ready to grasp their pitchforks and annihilate anything that doesn’t fit into their narrative of what’s right and normal.

The supporting characters were wonderfully drawn - angry, hurt, shit-kicking cousin Shiny; clever, realistic Rae; and Fisher, constantly concerned with his own self-preservation. 

We experience Clementine’s sudden adjustment to a world that’s seemingly recovered from the events of ten years prior, her exploration of the dark underbelly of the town, and her need to try save everything in her path. However, with powers running amok in an uneasy community, things soon come to a head for our magically-inclined protagonists